Thursday, July 20, 2017

July 20, Food Highlights
Fortune Cookie Day and Lollipop Day



July 20, National Lollipop Day
Lollipops are what we call "Empty Calories." A food labeled as empty calories provide little to no nutrients, except calories. The calories in the "Dum Dum Pop" comes from sugar and corn syrup.

Food Network - Dum Dum Pops Unwrapped





Wednesday, July 19, 2017

National Hot Dog Day
Regulations, Safety and Nutrition



National Hot Dog and Sausage Council

How It's Made - Hot Dogs
U.S. Laws Regulating Hot Dogs
Food Safety
Hot Dogs and Nutrition
Hot Dogs and Sodium Nitrate
Choking risk
Commercials Then and Now

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce designated July as National Hot Dog Month in 1957. The National Hot Dog and Sausage Council (http://www.hot-dog.org) is an organization created in 1994 by the American Meat Institute and is funded by contributions from hot dog and sausage manufacturers and suppliers of equipment, ingredients and services. The Council conducts scientific research and provides information to consumers and media on questions related to quality, safety, nutrition and preparation of hot dogs and sausages.

What's In A Hot Dog by Joy Bauer


How It's Made - Hot Dogs  


U.S. Laws Regulating Hot Dogs 
A hot dog, frankfurter or wiener is a cooked sausage. They are made from beef, pork, veal, turkey, chicken, or a combination and the label must state the type of meat and other foods used.


Federal Standards of Identity.
1. Hot dogs may not contain more than 30% fat or no more than 10% water.
2. Beef or all-beef: Contains only beef with no soybean protein or dry milk solid fillers added.
3. Kosher: All-beef, usually heavily seasoned.
4. Frankfurter may contain up to 3.5 percent fillers and made from a combination of meats.
5. Turkey or Chicken Franks can contain turkey or chicken and turkey or chicken skin and fat in proportion to a turkey or chicken carcass.
6. If variety meats, cereal or soy fillers are used, the product name must be changed to "links" or the presence must be declared on the label. Hot dogs can be 15% byproducts; heart, kidney, liver or other organs. But it must be labeled.
7. Up to 3.5% non-meat binders and extenders (such as nonfat dry milk, cereal, or dried whole milk) or 2% isolated soy protein may be used, but must be shown in the ingredients statement on the product's label by its common name.
8. If a hot dog has a casing, or a thin skin and it is different than the meat used in the hot dog, the label must say so. For example, if a chicken hot dog has a pork casing, the label must list the pork casing on the ingredients list. If the casing is artificially colored, the label must indicate this
9. All ingredients in the product must be listed in the ingredients statement in order of predominance, from highest to lowest amounts.
10. To protect consumers against Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy, mechanically separated beef is considered inedible and is prohibited for use as food. It is not permitted in hot dogs or any other processed product. (Mechanically separated meat is a process whereby meat is separated from the bone by scraping, shaving, or pressing the meat from the bone without crushing, breaking or grinding the bone.)
11. Mechanically separated pork is permitted and must be labeled as "mechanically separated pork" in the ingredients statement. Hot dogs can contain no more than 20% mechanically separated pork.
12. Hot dogs can contain any amount of mechanically separated chicken or turkey.
 
A vegetarian hot dog is a hot dog produced completely from non-meat products. Vegetarian hot dogs are usually from some sort of soy protein, but some contain egg whites (not acceptable to vegans). There are also vegetarian hot dogs made from tofu.

Food Safety
1. Hot dogs should be reheated until steaming hot before eating, due to the threat of listeriosis.
2. If there is no product date, hot dogs can be safely stored in the refrigerator in the unopened package for 2 weeks; once opened, only 1 week.
3. Frozen hot dogs maintain their quality for about 1 or 2 months.
4. Do not leave hot dogs at room temperature for more than 2 hours and no more than 1 hour when the temperature goes above 90 °F.
 
Hot Dogs and Nutrition
The traditional hot dog is high in fat and salt, and contains very little or no fiber. Yet Americans typically consume 7 billion hot dogs during Hot Dog Season which runs from Memorial Day to Labor Day.

Below is a list of hot dogs, from beef, pork, turkey, low fat, no fat and vegetarian. Moderation, individual needs and preferences are key to planning your meals. If you are someone that eats hot dogs more than once a week, it might be wise to choose a lower-fat variety.

The analysis provided is based on 2 ounces cooked. It is important to read the label and check the portion size. Some of the hot dogs listed below were rounded up to 2 ounces in order to show a comparison of equal weight.




Hot Dogs and Sodium Nitrate/Nitrite
Many brands of hot dogs contain sodium nitrite and nitrate. It is used as a food preservative, flavor enhancer, prevents spoilage and helps prevent botulism. Sodium nitrite and nitrate occur naturally in some vegetables, fruits, grains, spices and water. In the 1970’s there were a number of studies that linked the consumption of nitrite with cancer in laboratory rats.

As a result, the FDA and the USDA commissioned a comprehensive review of sodium nitrite's role as a food additive. The results from the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) stated that nitrite does not cause cancer, although exposure to high nitrite levels in certain populations may be associated with cancers. The NAS recommended people's exposure to both nitrates and nitrites be reduced as much as possible without endangering the protection against botulism.

The meat industry made substantial changes in the past 20 years to address the concerns about nitrite in cured meats. It reduced the use of nitrite in the processing of cured meats and now averages one-tenth of what the regulations allow.

In a Consumer Report analysis, it was found that the nitrates and nitrites in all the hot dogs tested were well below the maximum level for the additives established by the USDA. A hot dog labeled uncured cannot add nitrates or nitrites, but that does not necessarily mean the product is free of them. The three uncured hot dogs tested contained nitrites and nitrates because the compounds occur naturally in spices and other natural ingredients added during processing.

As I reviewed the literature, it was clear the controversy over nitrites causing cancer still exists today. The American Institute for Cancer Research report found that consuming one 50-gram serving of processed meat (about one hot dog) every day increases the risk of colorectal cancer by 20 percent. According to the AICR, the average risk of colorectal cancer is 5.8 percent, but 7 percent when a hot dog is consumed daily over years.

Choking Risk
Policy Statement Prevention of Choking Among Children, American Academy of Pediatrics http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/reprint/peds.2009-2862v1 (pdf)
Hot dogs present a significant choking risk, especially for children under 14 years of age. Seventeen percent of all food-related asphyxiations are caused by hot dogs. It is suggested the size, shape and texture of hot dogs be modified to reduce the risk of choking. Pediatric emergency doctors note that a wedged hot dog is almost impossible to dislodge from a child's windpipe. To serve hot dogs safely for children, one should slice the hot dog into bite-size pieces. For adults it is recommended to slice hot dogs down the middle length-wise.


Commercials Then and Now

Hebrew National Hotdog Commercial

1978 commercial for Oscar Mayer Hot Dog Wieners. Hot diggity!


OSCAR MAYER, 1960’s

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

July 18, Nelson Mandela Day - Food Security Theme



What Can I Do On Mandela Day?

The overarching objective of Mandela Day is to inspire individuals to take action to help change the world for the better, and in doing so build a global movement for good. Ultimately it seeks to empower communities everywhere. “Take Action; Inspire Change; Make Every Day a Mandela Day.”

Individuals and organisations are free to participate in Mandela Day as they wish. We do however urge everyone to adhere to the ethical framework of “service to one’s fellow human”.

Raffis' tribute to humanity's hero sprang from Mandelas' call to global leaders in 2000
to turn this world around, for the children. In 2001, Raffi sang this for
Nelson Mandela at Torontos Ryerson University.



Nelson Mandela Tribute from George Stroumboulopoulos

A short biography of Nelson Mandela

Nelson Mandela Day:
If the legacy of Nelson Mandela’s life and work is to be dynamic, it must be “owned” by current and future generations. It must be accessible to everyone, and applied in constantly changing contexts of time and place.


Friday, July 14, 2017

National Grilling Month - Safe Grilling Tips


Safe Summer Grilling

Grilling is a form of cooking involving dry heat applied to the surface of food, usually from above or below. Grilling involves a significant amount of direct, radiant heat, and tends to be used for cooking meat quickly.

Grilling is often performed outdoors, using charcoal, real wood, preformed briquettes, or propane gas. Mesquite or hickory wood chips (damp) may be added on top of the coals to allow a smoldering effect that provides additional flavor to the food. Other hardwoods such as pecan, apple, maple and oak may also be used.

Gridironing is the cooking of meats or other foods using a grill suspended above a heat source. This cover can be used as smokers for grilling, roasting, or barbecuing.

Risks of Grilling

Studies show cooking beef, pork, poultry, and fish at high temperatures can lead to the formation of heterocyclic amines (HCA), benzopyrenes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), which are carcinogens. Grilling is frequently presented as a healthy alternative to cooking with oil, although the fat and juices lost by grilling can contribute to drier food.

Healthy Grilling Tips

1. Grill Fruits and Vegetables. Grilling fruits and vegetables is a way to reduce your risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, obesity, and some types of cancer.

PAHs and HCAs do not form on grilled fruits and vegetables. In addition, if you are having grilled meat, the fruits and vegetables will provide antioxidants.

2. Grill with Lean Meat. Choose lean meats or trim visible fat and skin to limit the amount of fat that drips on the coals.

3. Marinating.  It is possible to reduce carcinogens when grilling meat, or lessen their effect. Garlic, rosemary, basil, mint, sage, savory, marjoram, oregano, olive oil, and cherries have been shown to reduce formation of both HCAs and PAHs by as much as 92% to 99%. Choosing the right marinade ingredients limits the fat dripping on the coal. Select wines, vinegars, lemon, lime juice, low-sodium soy sauce, honey, onions, herbs, spices, fat-free or low-fat marinades on your grilled meats, fish, and poultry.

Meats and poultry should marinate at least 1-2 hours; fish and vegetables usually only need to marinate for an hour. Marinating enhances the flavor of meats, fruits, and vegetables.

4. Cut Down on Grilling Time. Grill smaller portions of meat, poultry, and fish so they cook faster and spend less time on the grill. Another method is pre-cooking the meat in the microwave, and then draining meat juices so they do not fall onto flames, preventing the release of PAHs.

A skewer or brochette is a fun way to cook small pieces of food. The resulting food product is often called a "kabob" which means "to grill" in Persian.

5. Cooking Temperatures. Make sure to bring a cooking thermometer. Cook beef to 160 degrees Fahrenheit and poultry to 165 degrees
Fahrenheit.

Resources
1. Wikipedia, Grilling
2. WebMD, A Healthier Way to Grill 





National Macaroni and Cheese Day


Recipe from Cooking Light: Three-Cheese Macaroni and Cheese

Nutrition Information 
Calories 321; fat 9.9 g; protein 17.4 g; carbohydrate 40.8 g; 
Dietary fiber 2.4 g; cholesterol 26 mg; iron 1.5 mg; sodium 487 mg; calcium 332 mg

Recipes 

Friday, July 7, 2017

July 7, Portion Control: National Strawberry Sundae Day

July 7 is designated as National Strawberry Sundae Day. With portion planning you can turn a sundae into a healthy snack or even a nourishing breakfast.






Strawberry Sundae with Granola
Ingredients.
1/4 cup Light Strawberry Ice Cream
1 Tablespoon Granola
1/4 cup Strawberries, chopped
1/2 cup Strawberries

Nutrition Information.
 97 Calories; 2 g Protein; 18 g Carbohydrates; 2 g Dietary Fiber; 2 g Fat (g); 5 mg Cholesterol;  49 mg Vitamin C; 70 mcg Folate; 34 mg Sodium

Strawberry Sundae with Yogurt and Granola
Ingredients.
1/3 cup Light Frozen Strawberry Yogurt
2 Tablespoon Granola
1/4 cup Strawberries, chopped
1/2 cup Strawberries
1.5 teaspoons Strawberry Preserves

Nutrition Information. 165 Calories; 3 g Protein; 34 g Carbohydrates; 2 g Dietary Fiber; 3 g Fat (g); 7 mg Cholesterol; 49 mg Vitamin C; 120 mcg Folate; 48 mg Sodium


Strawberry Sundae Cone

Wednesday, July 5, 2017

July 5, National Graham Cracker Day

The graham cracker was invented in 1829 in New Jersey, by Sylvester Graham. The original graham cracker was made with graham flour, a combination of finely-ground unbleached-wheat flour with the wheat bran and germ coarsely-ground and added back in providing nutrition and flavor. Graham crackers started out as a bland food, unsweetened or mildly sweetened; today they are known as a sugar sweetened baked good, similar to the English term biscuit.

Graham crackers are a common American snack for young children and older adults; often accompanied with fruit juice or milk.



How to Make Graham Crackers

Resource
Graham cracker, From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia







Tuesday, July 4, 2017

Happy Birthday America
Healthy Red, White, and Blue Foods







Red, White, and Blue Food Choices

Red, White, and Blue on a Bun


Yields: 2 servings

Ingredients
1 Whole Wheat Hamburger Bun
1 Whole Wheat Hot Dog Bun
1 Strawberry
9 Raspberries
3 Blackberries
14 Blueberries
1 Tbsp Cream Cheese, reduced-fat



Red, White, and Blue Parfait

Ingredients
1/3 cup Blueberries
1/3 cup Fat free Vanilla Yogurt
1/3 cup Strawberries, sliced



Red, White, and Blue Sandwich on
 Sourdough Bread with Cream Cheese,
Yogurt-Covered Raisins, Blueberries,
Raspberries, and Strawberries

Ingredients
2 slices thin Sourdough Bread
2 Tbsp Cream Cheese, low fat
7 yogurt-covered Raisins
1/2 cup Blueberries
2 Strawberries
4 Raspberries


Directions
1. Spread cream cheese on half the bread.
2. Use the yogurt-covered raisins and blueberries as the stars on the flag.
3. Slice strawberries to form the stripes on the flag.
4. Garnish: Blueberries and Raspberries.




Monday, July 3, 2017

July 3, Eat Beans Day

The nutrition information provided below is based on 1/2 cup cooked beans, prepared from dry beans. No salt has been added, therefore sodium levels are insignificant. Beans contain no cholesterol and a small amount of fat. They are a great source of fiber, high in potassium and contain many of the B vitamins. Beans also provide between 7% to 18% of one's daily iron needs.

All About Beans

The US Dry Bean Council (USDBC) is a private trade association comprised of leaders in the bean industry with the common goal of promoting the U.S. edible bean trade, both in the United States and abroad, and educating U.S. consumers about the benefits of beans. The USDBC gives a voice to the bean industry and provides information to consumers, health professionals, buyers, suppliers and the media about the good taste, nutritional value and versatility of beans.

The USDBC also is a resource for information on U.S. exporters, overseas importers, U.S. dry bean classes, trade policy issues and the role of U.S.-grown beans in international food-aid efforts. USDBC also publishes foreign language newsletters and other publications designed to help overseas importers, packagers and canners better understand and maintain contact with the U.S. dry bean exporting trade.

As part of USDBC’s mission, the organization collaborates with public health organizations, research centers, universities, and the entire supply chain, from seed suppliers to farmers, processors, wholesalers, distributors and transporters.

While the USDBC is privately funded, its representatives work closely with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) in overseas markets, and often co-sponsors activities with the U.S. Government. These activities include hosting trade missions from foreign countries to visit U.S. production and processing facilities, participating in trade shows worldwide, coordinating trade missions of U.S. exporters and growers to visit overseas markets and producing education

The USDBC is headquartered in Washington, D.C., with a marketing office in Pierre, South Dakota. In addition, USDBC representatives around the world facilitate activities and dialog between U.S. and overseas trade.


Benefits
Unlike meat-based proteins, beans are naturally low in fat and are a cholesterol-free source of protein. Research shows that a diet including beans may reduce your risk of heart disease.

A nutrient-rich food, beans contain protein, complex carbohydrates, fiber, antioxidants, and important vitamins and minerals, such as folate, B-Vitamins, manganese, potassium and iron.

Folate, a vitamin very important for pregnant women and their unborn babies, is found in beans. During pregnancy, women need more folate. Expectant mothers who consume enough of the right nutrients can help reduce the risk of birth defects.

Beans are especially important for people with certain food allergies and intolerances. For example, some people can’t tolerate gluten, a natural protein present in wheat, barley and rye. Because beans don’t contain gluten, or major allergens found in various grains, substituting beans can help provide the fiber and other nutrients that people on restricted diets may be missing. Beans come in a variety of convenient forms (such as canned beans, bean flours and dehydrated beans) that can be used in place of allergenic and gluten-containing ingredients.

Bean Recipes
Black Bean Soup Garnished with
Green Onions

Black Bean Soup Garnished with Green Onions and
Reduced-fat Sour Cream Served in a Sourdough Roll



Sunday, July 2, 2017

July 2, Made in America Day


Made in USA

Do you promote your products as “Made in the USA”? Under the law, some products must disclose U.S. content. For others, manufacturers and marketers who choose to make claims about the amount of U.S. content need to know about the Federal Trade Commission's (FTC) Enforcement Policy Statement on U.S. Origin Claims. Is your company up on what's required?


The Made in USA mark is a country of origin label indicating the product is "all or virtually all" made in the United States. The label is regulated by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC).

In general, goods imported into the United States must have a country of origin label unless excepted, but goods manufactured in the United States can be sold without any sort of "Made in the USA" label unless explicitly required. Voluntary claims made about the amount of U.S. content in other products must comply with the FTC’s Made in USA policy.

A Made in USA claim can be expressed (for example, "American-made") or implied. In identifying implied claims, the Commission focuses on the overall impression of the advertising, label, or promotional material. Depending on the context, U.S. symbols or geographic references (for example, U.S. flags, outlines of U.S. maps, or references to U.S. locations of headquarters or factories) may convey a claim of U.S. origin either by themselves, or in conjunction with other phrases or images.



Jobs are scarce and the government is encouraging companies to open up businesses in America. Why are Medicare dollars being used to purchase foods from Thailand and the Philippines?

How many jobs would be created if 
government programs were required to purchase items “Made in America?”

Resources

1. Federal Trade Commission Protecting American's Consumer
2. Products Made in the USA Directory, Made in USA Forever
3. 
Federal Trade Commission: Complying with the Made in USA Standard
4. Made in USA, Wikipedia









Saturday, July 1, 2017

July Health, Nutrition, and Food Events

Current News, Resources and Events in Nutrition, Food, Health, Environment, Safety and Disability Rights. Encourages awareness and inspires ideas for Journalists, Educators, Consumers and Health Professionals. Wellness News is up-dated daily and includes weekly and daily events. To view the entire Newsletter online click here.


July Featured Causes and Events


An Independence Day Tribute

July Health, Nutrition, and Food Events






National Baked Bean Month
National Blueberry Month


National Culinary Arts Month


National Grilling Month
National Horseradish Month
National Hot Dog Month
National Ice Cream Month
     National Pickle Month
National Picnic Month


National Watermelon Month

Smart Irrigation Month
Herbal/Prescription Interaction Awareness Month
International Group B Strep Awareness Month
Juvenile Arthritis Awareness Month
Family Reunion Month
National Make a Difference to Children Month
National Recreation and Parks Month
Sandwich Generation Month

Wellness News employs young adults with "Special Needs" (Cerebral Palsy, Autism, Down Syndrome, Muscular Dystrophy). Contact Dr. Sandra Frank for additional information (recipenews@gmail.com).




Prepared by 


Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RD, LDN
Jake FrankJohn Gargiullo
Michelle Canazaro




Thursday, June 29, 2017

Mango, Tomato, and Green Onion Salad

 Mango, Tomato, and Green Onion Salad


Ingredients
1/3 cup Mango
1/2 cup Tomato, diced
2 Tbsp Green Onions





Nutrition Information




Mango, Tomato, and Green Onion Salad
with Breadstick



Ingredients
1/3 cup Mango
1/2 cup Tomato, diced
2 Tbsp Green Onions
1 Breadstick

Nutrition Information

Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Potty Training Awareness Month
Preventing Constipation


June is Potty Training Awareness Month. Constipation in children is a common problem when potty training. Constipation is often characterized by infrequent bowel movements or hard, dry stools.

Causes of Constipation in Children

Toilet Training and Withholding. Your child may ignore the urge to have a bowel movement because of fear of the toilet or they don’t want to take a play break. Some children withhold when they are away from home because they are embarrassed to use a public bathroom. Withholding bowel movements sometimes results in a large painful mass of stool in the rectum called a fecal impaction. If it hurts to have a bowel movement, your child may try to avoid a repeat of the uncomfortable situation. If you begin toilet training too early, children may hold in there stools, which can quickly become an involuntary habit that's tough to break.

Dietary Changes. Lack of fruits and vegetables or fluid in your child's diet may cause constipation. For some children, too much milk and not enough water can lead to constipation.

Medication or Disease. Certain antacids, antidepressants, muscle relaxants and various other drugs can contribute to constipation. Changes in your child's appetite or diet due to illness may have the same effect.

Emotional Pressure to use the toilet or to give up diapers.

Symptoms of constipation in children
*Fewer bowel movements than usual.
*The child is fidgeting, clenching buttocks muscles or other unusual dancelike behaviors.
*Experiencing Abdominal pain and cramping.
*Painful or difficult bowel movements.
*Hard, dry, or large stools.
*Feces in the child’s underwear.

Prevention of constipation in children
*Offer high-fiber foods. Include: Fruits and Vegetables; Beans and Lentils; Bran sprinkled on cereals or yogurt; Whole grain bread and cereal; Dried or soft fruit added to muffins or cereal; Fruit spread

If your child does not like vegetables, serve them hidden in casseroles, pastas or puree in soups. Ask your child to help out when preparing meals. Children are more willing to eat their food if they play a role in making their own meals.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends the following amounts of fiber needed per age and gender. Pediatric Nutrition Handbook, 6th ed. Elk Grove Village (IL): American Academy of Pediatrics; 2009
Age/Gender            Fiber (grams)
2 - 3 years                       19
4 – 8 years                       25
9 – 11 years (female)       26
9 – 11 years (male)          31

*Encourage your child to drink plenty of fluids. Water is the best choice.
*Establish regular meal and snack times
*Promote physical activity. Regular physical activity helps stimulate normal bowel function.
*Create a toilet schedule. Set aside time after meals for your child to use the toilet.
*Remind your child to use the bathroom.
*Ask your doctor if your child is taking any medication that may cause constipation.

Treatment of Constipation in Children
*Follow the prevention instructions.
*Consult with the pediatrician or family doctor before using over-the-counter suppositories or laxatives.
*Contact the doctor if four or five days have passed without a bowel movement, or if constipation is accompanied by abdominal pain, vomiting or fever.
*Consult a dietitian who can help create an appropriate food plan high in fiber.

Resouces
Foods to Boost Your Child’s Fiber, Nourish Interactive (pdf)
American Academy of Pediatrics
International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

This young child describes his concerns about Potty Training
 

 Potty Training Tips from Parents TV - For Mom
 

Elmo and his Father show How
Potty Time Can Be Fun: Sesame Street
 
 


The information presented here does not constitute medical advice for any individual. Specific cases may vary. Dietitians-Online and Weighing-Success recommends readers consult a qualified health professional on an individual basis. All materials are provided for your information only and may not be construed as medical advice or instruction. Readers should consult appropriate health professionals on any matter relating to their health and well-being.


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