Monday, November 20, 2017

November 20, Universal Children's Day - Resources from Around the World





The future of tomorrow are the children of today.

A review of organizations dedicated to improving the quality of Children's lives. Presented through songs, news reports, mission statements, and children.

UNICEF. Voices of Youth
Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Kids Eat Right 
Free the Children


Love Is All | Playing For Change


By resolution 836(IX) of 14 December 1954, the General Assembly recommended that all countries institute a Universal Children's Day, to be observed as a day of worldwide fraternity and understanding between children. It recommended that the Day was to be observed also as a day of activity devoted to promoting the ideals and objectives of the Charter and the welfare of the children of the world. The Assembly suggested to governments that the Day be observed on the date and in the way which each considers appropriate. The date 20 November, marks the day on which the Assembly adopted the Declaration of the Rights of the Child, in 1959, and the Convention on the Rights of the Child, in 1989.

In 2000 world leaders outlined Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) – which range from halving extreme poverty to halting the spread of HIV/AIDS and providing universal primary education, all by the target date of 2015. Though the Goals are for all humankind, they are primarily about children.


UN launches new drive to protect children
More than ever before, young people are recognized as having rights -
and as having an active role to play in asserting those rights.

WHO (World Health Organization). 
10 Facts On Nutrition

1. Malnutrition is a major contributor to disease and early deaths for mothers and children. Undernutrition, including vitamin and mineral deficiencies, contributes to about one third of all child deaths, and impairs healthy development. At the same time, growing rates of overweight are linked to a rise in chronic diseases. The result is a double burden of malnutrition.

2. An indicator of chronic malnutrition is stunting. This is when children are too short for their age group. About 165 million children globally are stunted resulting from not enough food, a vitamin-mineral poor diet, inadequate child care and disease. As growth slows down, brain development lags and stunted children learn poorly.

3. Wasting and bilateral oedema are severe forms of malnutrition - resulting from acute food shortages and compounded by illness. About 1.5 million children die annually due to wasting. Rising food prices, food scarcity in areas of conflict, and natural disasters diminish household access to appropriate and adequate food, all of which can lead to wasting.

4. Essential vitamins and minerals in the diet are vital to boost immunity and healthy development. Vitamin A, zinc, iron and iodine deficiencies are primary public health concerns. About 2 billion people are affected by inadequate iodine nutrition worldwide. More than one third of preschool-age children globally are vitamin A deficient. Vitamin A deficiency is the leading cause of preventable blindness in children.

5. Maternal undernutrition leads to poor fetal development and higher risk of pregnancy complications. Together, maternal and child undernutrition account for more than 10 percent of the global burden of disease.

6. For healthier babies, WHO recommends exclusive breastfeeding for six months, introducing age-appropriate and safe complementary foods at six months, and continuing breastfeeding for up to two years or beyond. Worldwide, about 20% of deaths among children under-five could be avoided if these feeding guidelines are followed. Appropriate feeding decreases rates of stunting and obesity and stimulates intellectual development in young children.

7. Nutritional problems in adolescents start during childhood and continue into adult life. Anemia is a key nutritional problem in adolescent girls. Preventing early pregnancies and assuring adequate intakes of essential nutrients for developing girls can reduce maternal and child deaths later, and stop cycles of malnutrition from one generation to the next. Globally, anemia affects 42% of pregnant women.

8. The rise in overweight and obesity worldwide is a major public health challenge. People of all ages and backgrounds face this form of malnutrition. As a consequence, rates of diabetes, cardiovascular disease and other diet-related conditions are escalating worldwide. These are very difficult to treat in places with limited resources and with already overburdened health systems. About 43 million children under age five are overweight, according to 2011 figures. 


9. Nutrition information is required to identify the areas where assistance is most needed. WHO released international child growth standards that provide benchmarks to compare children's nutritional status within and across countries and regions. 

10. Public education is another way to improve nutritional health. Starting in China during the Beijing Olympics, and continuing in other countries, WHO and Member States will promote "5 keys" to a healthy diet:
a. give your baby only breast milk for the first six months of life
b. eat a variety of foods
c. eat plenty of vegetables and fruits
d. eat moderate amounts of fat and oils
e. eat less salt and sugars

Resources

November 2010, the American Dietetic Association (ADA) and ADA Foundation officially launched their first joint initiative, Kids Eat Right. The two-tiered campaign aims to mobilize ADA members to participate in childhood obesity prevention efforts, and to educate families, communities, and policy makers about the importance of quality nutrition.

Mission: The Kids Eat Right campaign was launched to support public education projects and programs that address the national health concern of obesity among our children. 

To learn more about the Kids Eat Right Campaign visit:
Website. Kids Eat Right
Facebook.  Kids Eat Right




"Raffi" (Raffi Cavoukian), C.M., O.B.C. 
Founder and Chair, Centre for Child Honouring.

"Imagine a new idea as vital as democracy.
Now imagine helping it spread
quickly throughout the world! Child Honouring is one such idea,
an idea whose time has come.
 - Raffi

He is known to millions as "Raffi", a beloved songwriter and performer, author, ecology advocate and founder of Centre for Child Honouring. Child Honouring is a vision for creating a humane and sustainable world by addressing the universal needs of children.

Centre for Child Honouring and join "the compassion revolution."

Covenant for Honouring Children
 

Turn This World Around
Raffi's tribute to humanity's hero sprang from Mandela's call to global leaders in 2000 to turn this world around, for the children. In 2001, Raffi sang this for Nelson Mandela at Torontos Ryerson University. The song expresses the essence of Raffi's Child Honouring philosophy, a children-first paradigm for societal change. A child-friendly world enriches all of us, and offers the best chance to create sustainable cultures. All children want to live in peace and to follow their dreams.

As the largest humanitarian provider of school meals worldwide, the World Food Programme ( WFP), along with governments and partners, supports education, reduces malnutrition, and promotes development, especially during times of crises and emergencies.


Nearly all countries around the world have a school meals programme and about 368 million children from kindergarten to secondary school receive food at school every day. Governments recognize school meals as an essential tool for the development and growth of children, communities, and society as a whole.

WFP provides school meals to more than 20 million children every year. But many more children do not benefit from school meals, and in countries with the highest poverty rates where school meals would make a big difference, the reach of school meal programmes is far smaller. 

In WFP's efforts to create a world where educational and nutritional opportunities reach the hungry poor, schools are critical. It’s where we lay the foundation for future generations to grow and thrive.






Sunday, November 19, 2017

November 19, Carbonated Beverage with Caffeine Day

Though today we look at the caffeine in Carbonated Beverages, this is also an opportunity to view the caffeine in energy drinks that have been cited as the cause of some deaths and is currently being investigated by the US FDA. Some energy drinks contain 2 to 3 times the amount of caffeine found in soda.


How much Caffeine is too much?
Mayo Clinic

Up to 400 milligrams (mg) of caffeine, a day appears to be safe for most healthy adults. That's roughly the amount of caffeine in four cups of brewed coffee, 10 cans of cola or two "energy shot" drinks.
Although caffeine use may be safe for adults, it's not a good idea for children. And adolescents should limit themselves to no more than 100 mg of caffeine a day.

Even among adults, heavy caffeine use can cause unpleasant side effects. And caffeine may not be a good choice for people who are highly sensitive to its effects or who take certain medications.
5-Hour Energy Drinks: FDA Looks Into Caffeinated Beverage

Hidden Dangers of Caffeinated Energy Drinks


Caffeine (mg) based on 12-ounces Soda

Caffeine   Soda
  (mg)
 71.2         Jolt       
 69.0         Diet Pepsi Max 
 55.0         Pepsi One
 55.0         Mountain Dew
 55.0         Mountain Dew Code Red
 55.0         Diet Mountain Dew
 46.5         Tab
 45.6         Diet Coke
 44.4         Shasta Diet Cola
 43.0         Diet RC Cola
 43.0         Diet Dr. Pepper
 40.0         Diet Sunkist Orange
 37.5         Pepsi-Cola
 36.0         Diet Pepsi
 34.0         Coca-Cola Classic
 34.0         Diet Cherry Coke
 29.0         AW Creme Soda
 22.0         AW Diet Creme Soda
 0              7-Up
 0              Sprite, regular or diet
 0              AW Root Beer

National Farm-City Week - Harvesting Healthy Choices



Farm-City Week is celebrated each year.  The purpose of Farm-City Week is to bring about a better understanding between rural and urban people by increasing their knowledge and appreciation of each other as partners in progress.

Farm-City: Harvesting Healthy Choices
Statistics indicated that about one-third of American children ages 6 to 19 are overweight, and a growing number of young people suffer from cardiovascular disease, high cholesterol, Type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure.

Farm-City theme of “Harvesting Healthy Choices” gives farmers an opportunity to join forces with their city neighbors to show the healthy food choices available.


Harvesting Healthy Choices allows the opportunity to talk about the health benefits of locally grown produce and other foods:
- the bone-building power of milk;
- the leaner choices in beef, pork and poultry;
- the importance of folic acid-rich peanuts to expectant mothers;
- the cancer fighting properties of soybeans;
- the antioxidant power of blueberries 

What’s more, modern agriculture produces healthier animals, more nutritious grains and year-round access to fresh fruits and vegetables. Healthy food doesn’t just mean tofu and bean sprouts. A 5-ounce portion of lean beef or pork can be part of a balanced diet, and milk, cheese, bread and even fried catfish still have a place on Alabama’s dinner table. 

Eating well and living well are about choices – and is important to all ages in helping us create a healthier state. For more information on a balanced diet which includes fruits, vegetables, grains, protein and dairy products please visit the Department of Agriculture’s “My Plate” Nutritional Guide at www.choosemyplate.gov.

Resource:





Saturday, November 18, 2017

November 18, National Vichyssoise Day

Vichyssoise is a thick soup made of puréed leeks, onions, potatoes, cream, and a soup stock (usually chicken). It is traditionally served cold but can be eaten hot.




Serves: 5
Ingredients
1 teaspoon canola oil
3 cups diced leek (about 3 large)
3 cups diced peeled baking potato (about 1 1/4 pounds)
1 (16-ounce) can fat-free, low-sodium vegetable (or chicken) broth
2/3 cup half-and-half
1/8 teaspoon black pepper
1 tablespoon minced fresh chives


Directions
1. Heat the canola oil in a large sauce-pan over medium-low heat. 
2. Add the diced leek; cover and cook for 10 minutes or until soft. 
3. Stir in the diced potato and broth, and bring to a boil. 
4. Cover the potato mixture, reduce heat, and simmer for 15 minutes or until the potato is tender. 
5. Place the potato mixture in a blender or food processor, and process until smooth. 
6. Place the potato mixture in a large bowl, and cool to room temperature.
7. Stir in the half-and-half and black pepper.
8. Cover and chill. Sprinkle soup with minced chives.

Nutrition Information




Modified from Cooking Light, September 2000

Nutritional Analysis Services

Ensure accurate and cost effective nutritional analysis for your recipes utilizing an extensive research database and 25 years experience. A great service for the Recipe Bloggers, Media, Cookbook Publishers, Writers, Chefs, and Recipe Websites. Your readers will enjoy and benefit from the Nutrition information.

For more information, visit Dietitians-Online Nutritional Analysis Services

contact:
Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RDN, LN, FAND
recipenews@gmail.com
954-796-7235







Friday, November 17, 2017

World Prematurity Awareness Day - Nutritional Challenges and Resources

#WorldPrematurityAwarenessDay - Premature birth is the leading cause of death in children under the age of five worldwide.  #MarchofDimes http://bit.ly/2hxitDf



#WorldPrematurityAwarenessDay - Premature Infant - Getting to Know the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) http://wb.md/2zSKnCh  #MarchofDimes #WebMD


#WorldPrematurityAwarenessDay Feeding your baby in the NICU
 - http://bit.ly/2A9VcT6  #MarchofDimes


2017 Premature Birth Report Cards
#WorldPrematurityAwarenessDay   http://bit.ly/2hHhzYM


#WorldPrematurityAwarenessDay How can having a premature baby affect
a family emotionally? http://bit.ly/2AP6R6p #MarchofDimes 



#WorldPrematurityAwarenessDay and Nutrition - Premature Infant -
The First Weeks at Home    http://wb.md/2hHutWD #MarchofDimes



#WorldPrematurityAwarenessDay In honor of babies born too soon and little ones we've lost, please support the March of Dimes’ work to prevent and reduce premature birth. All donations made today will be triple-matched. http://bit.ly/2hxitDf


Thursday, November 16, 2017

November 16, National Fast Food Day

A look at the Fast Food Industry


Many fast food items are high in Fat, Cholesterol, Saturated Fat and Sodium and are Risk Factors associated with Heart Disease. However,  the informed customer can make healthier choices at fast food restaurants. Below is the nutrition information of some Fast Food Hamburgers. Calories range from 140 for a White Castle Slyder to 1061 calories for a Burger King Cheeseburger, Double Whopper.


In recognition of National Fast Food Day, here is an interview from the Oscar-nominated director of Food, INC., Robert Kenner. Food, INC examines the harmful role corporate farming and the food industry has on our environment and health.



Healthy Options are the New Fast Food Trend



The Fast Food Burger
Burger Love Handles is a song written by Don MacLeod about

his personal battle with being overweight.
The song focuses 
on fast foods as one
of his difficulties in losing weight.




Pressure Ulcer Awareness Day - Pressure Injury Prevention Points and Nutrition Intervention

The National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) serves as the authoritative voice for improved patient outcomes in pressure injury prevention and treatment through public policy, education and research. The objective of STOP logo 2017 World Wide Pressure Injury Prevention Day is to increase national awareness for pressure injury prevention and to educate the public on this topic. NPUAP has developed an extensive media materials package appropriate for all healthcare settings and organizations.



It is important to identify individuals who are prone to pressure injuries. I have a son with cerebral palsy. He is in a wheelchair and lacks movement without assistance. He receives a body check twice a day, but even with my constant supervision an ulcer can creep up quickly. I complained to the doctor two weeks ago I was concerned about his feet. Both were swollen and hot. The doctor placed him on antibiotics, but his left foot continued to get worse. On November 14, 2016, I had my son's aide take a photo of the wound and bring it to the doctor. The doctor immediately contacted a wound care nurse and his ankle was diagnosed as a stage II pressure ulcer. He is currently receiving wound care 3 time a week and physical therapy. Be your family and/or friends advocate.





Pressure Injury Prevention Points


Risk Assessment 
1. Consider bedfast and chairfast individuals to be at risk for development of pressure injury.

2. Use a structured risk assessment, such as the Braden Scale, to identify individuals at risk for pressure injury as soon as possible (but within 8 hours after admission).

3.  Refine the assessment by including these additional risk factors: 

    A. Fragile skin
    B. Existing pressure injury of any stage, including those ulcers that have healed or are 
closed 
    C. Impairments in blood flow to the extremities from vascular disease, diabetes or tobacco use 
    D. Pain in areas of the body exposed to pressure 

4. Repeat the risk assessment at regular intervals and with any change in condition. Base the frequency of regular assessments on acuity levels:
    A. Acute care. . . . . . . Every shift
    B. Long term care. . . Weekly for 4 weeks, then quarterly
    C. Home care. . . . . . . At every nurse visit

5. Develop a plan of care based on the areas of risk, rather than on the total risk assessment score. For example, if the risk stems from immobility, address turning, repositioning, and the support surface. If the risk is from malnutrition, address those problems.

Skin Care
1. Inspect all of the skin upon admission as soon as possible (but within 8 hours).

2.  Inspect the skin at least daily for signs of pressure injury, especially nonblanchable erythema.

3. Assess pressure points, such as the sacrum, coccyx, buttocks, heels, ischium, trochanters, elbows and beneath medical devices.

4.  When inspecting darkly pigmented skin, look for changes in skin tone,skin temperature and tissue consistency compared to adjacent skin. Moistening the skin assists in identifying changes in color.

5. Cleanse the skin promptly after episodes of incontinence.

6. Use skin cleansers that are pH balanced for the skin. 

7. Use skin moisturizers daily on dry skin.

8.  Avoid positioning an individual on an area of erythema or pressure injury.

Nutrition
1.  Consider hospitalized individuals to be at risk for under nutrition and malnutrition from their illness or being NPO for diagnostic testing.

2.  Use a valid and reliable screening tool to determine risk of malnutrition,such as the Mini Nutritional Assessment.

3.  Refer all individuals at risk for pressure injury from malnutrition to a registered dietitian/nutritionist. 


4. Assist the individual at mealtimes to increase oral intake. 

5.  Encourage all individuals at risk for pressure injury to consume adequate fluids and a balanced diet.

6.  Assess weight changes over time.

7.  Assess the adequacy of oral, enteral and parenteral intake.

8. Provide nutritional supplements between meals and with oral medications, unless contraindicated.


Repositioning and Mobilization
1. Turn and reposition all individuals at risk for pressure injury, unless contraindicated due to medical condition or medical treatments. 


2.  Choose a frequency for turning based on the support surface in use, the tolerance of skin for pressure and the individual’s preferences.

3.  Consider lengthening the turning schedule during the night to allow for uninterrupted sleep.

4.  Turn the individual into a 30-degree side lying position, and use your hand to determine if the sacrum is off the bed

5.  Avoid positioning the individual on body areas with pressure injury.

6. Ensure that the heels are free from the bed.

7.  Consider the level of immobility, exposure to shear,skin moisture, perfusion, body size and weight of the individual when choosing a support surface.

8. Continue to reposition an individual when placed on any support surface.

9.  Use a breathable incontinence pad when using microclimate management surfaces.

10.  Use a pressure redistributing chair cushion for individuals sitting in chairs or wheelchairs.

11. Reposition weak or immobile individuals in chairs hourly.

12.  If the individual cannot be moved or is positioned with the head of the bed elevated over 30°, place a polyurethane foam dressing on the sacrum.

13.  Use heel offloading devices or polyurethane foam dressings on individuals at high-risk for heel ulcers

14,  Place thin foam or breathable dressings under medical devices.

Education
1. Teach the individual and family about risk for pressure injury

2.  Engage individual and family in risk reduction interventions



Staging Pressure Injury




A pressure injury is localized damage to the skin and underlying soft tissue usually over a bony prominence or related to a medical or other device. The injury can present as intact skin or an open ulcer and may be painful. The injury occurs as a result of intense and/or prolonged pressure or pressure in combination with shear. The tolerance of soft tissue for pressure and shear may also be affected by microclimate, nutrition, perfusion, co-morbidities and condition of the soft tissue.
Stage 1 Pressure Injury: Non-blanchable erythema of intact skin. Intact skin with a localized area of non-blanchable erythema, which may appear differently in darkly pigmented skin. Presence of blanchable erythema or changes in sensation, temperature, or firmness may precede visual changes. Color changes do not include purple or maroon discoloration; these may indicate deep tissue pressure injury.
Stage 2 Pressure Injury: Partial-thickness skin loss with exposed dermis. Partial-thickness loss of skin with exposed dermis. The wound bed is viable, pink or red, moist, and may also present as an intact or ruptured serum-filled blister. Adipose (fat) is not visible and deeper tissues are not visible. Granulation tissue, slough and eschar are not present. These injuries commonly result from adverse microclimate and shear in the skin over the pelvis and shear in the heel.  This stage should not be used to describe moisture associated skin damage (MASD) including incontinence associated dermatitis (IAD), intertriginous dermatitis (ITD), medical adhesive related skin injury (MARSI), or traumatic wounds (skin tears, burns, abrasions).
Stage 3 Pressure Injury: Full-thickness skin loss. Full-thickness loss of skin, in which adipose (fat) is visible in the ulcer and granulation tissue and epibole (rolled wound edges) are often present. Slough and/or eschar may be visible. The depth of tissue damage varies by anatomical location; areas of significant adiposity can develop deep wounds.  Undermining and tunneling may occur. Fascia, muscle, tendon, ligament, cartilage and/or bone are not exposed. If slough or eschar obscures the extent of tissue loss this is an Unstageable Pressure Injury.
Stage 4 Pressure Injury: Full-thickness skin and tissue loss. Full-thickness skin and tissue loss with exposed or directly palpable fascia, muscle, tendon, ligament, cartilage or bone in the ulcer. Slough and/or eschar may be visible. Epibole (rolled edges), undermining and/or tunneling often occur. Depth varies by anatomical location. If slough or eschar obscures the extent of tissue loss this is an Unstageable Pressure Injury.
Unstageable Pressure Injury: Obscured full-thickness skin and tissue loss. Full-thickness skin and tissue loss in which the extent of tissue damage within the ulcer cannot be confirmed because it is obscured by slough or eschar.  If slough or eschar is removed, a Stage 3 or Stage 4 pressure injury will be revealed. Stable eschar (i.e. dry, adherent, intact without erythema or fluctuance) on the heel or ischemic limb should not be softened or removed.
Deep Tissue Pressure Injury: Persistent non-blanchable deep red, maroon or purple discoloration. Intact or non-intact skin with localized area of persistent non-blanchable deep red, maroon, purple discoloration or epidermal separation revealing a dark wound bed or blood filled blister. Pain and temperature change often precede skin color changes. Discoloration may appear differently in darkly pigmented skin.  This injury results from intense and/or prolonged pressure and shear forces at the bone-muscle interface.  The wound may evolve rapidly to reveal the actual extent of tissue injury, or may resolve without tissue loss. If necrotic tissue, subcutaneous tissue, granulation tissue, fascia, muscle or other underlying structures are visible, this indicates a full thickness pressure injury (Unstageable, Stage 3 or Stage 4).


Wednesday, November 15, 2017

November 15, America Recycles Day and
Clean Out Your Refrigerator Day

November 15, America Recycles Day and  
Clean Out Your Refrigerator Day

America Recycles Day is dedicated to the promotion of recycling programs in the United States. Since 1997, communities across the country have come together on November 15th to celebrate America Recycles Day.




Keep America Beautiful believes each of us holds an obligation to preserve and protect our environment. Through our everyday choices and actions, we collectively have a huge impact on our world. Keep America Beautiful follows a practical approach that unites citizens, businesses and government to find solutions advancing core issues of preventing litter, reducing waste, and beautifying communities.

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

According to the U.S. EPA (US Environmental Protection Agency), recycling:
    *Conserves natural resources to help sustain the environment.
    *
Reduces the need for landfilling and incineration.
     *Saves energy and prevents pollution.

Recycle Guys in the Supermarket

How You Can Help

1. Each community has different standards for what can be recycled and how to do it. Visit Keep America Beautiful and enter your zip code for your local information and resources.
2. Plastic. Look for the recycling symbol on plastic packaging or containers. #1 and #2 plastics should be accepted by almost every recycler.
3. Cans. Aluminum and steel cans are always welcomed by recyclers, and most metals can be recycled infinitely with no loss of quality.
4. Recycling and Traveling. Keep two trash bags in your vehicle - one bag for garbage, and one for recyclables. Pre-sorting makes it easier to transfer your recyclables to the proper container once you’ve reached your destination.
5. Recycle your wireless phone. Millions of out-of-service phones are waiting to be reused or recycled. Find a local charity with a phone recycling program, or visit http://www.kab.org/  to download a postage-paid mailing label and return your unused phones.
6. Paper. In addition to newspaper recycling, most communities will accept corrugated cardboard, and some will even accept junk mail, catalogs and phone books.
7. Electronics. Never throw old computers, monitors, TV’s, printers, or other electronics in the landfill. Instead, donate them to a local charity for reuse, or find out about your local e-cycling programs.
8. Reduce the amount of trash you throw away and reuse products before you throw them out or recycle them. This creates the least impact on the planet and our resources.

Clean Out Your Refrigerator Day
Before a food goes bad consider preparing meals in advance and freezing for later use. The food will last longer - Less Waste


Tuesday, November 14, 2017

November 14, World Diabetes Day - Women and Diabetes




World Diabetes Day (WDD) is celebrated every year on November 14th. The World Diabetes Day campaign is led by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and its association members. It joins millions of people worldwide in diabetes advocacy and awareness.


World Diabetes Day was created in 1991 by the International Diabetes Federation and the World Health Organization. World Diabetes Day became an official United Nations Day in 2007. The campaign draws attention to the issues of importance to the diabetes world and keeps diabetes in the public spotlight. 


The theme for WDD 2017 is Women and Diabetes.

The World Diabetes Day 2017 campaign will promote the importance of affordable and equitable access for all women at risk for or living with diabetes to the essential diabetes medicines and technologies, self-management education and information they require to achieve optimal diabetes outcomes and strengthen their capacity to prevent type 2 diabetes.

There are currently over 199 million women living with diabetes and this total is projected to increase to 313 million by 2040. Gender roles and power dynamics influence vulnerability to diabetes, affect access to health services and health seeking behavior for women, and amplify the impact of diabetes on women.

Diabetes is the ninth leading cause of death in women globally, causing 2.1 million deaths each year. As a result of socioeconomic conditions, girls and women with diabetes experience barriers in accessing cost-effective diabetes prevention, early detection, diagnosis, treatment and care, particularly in developing countries. Socioeconomic inequalities expose women to the main risk factors of diabetes, including poor diet and nutrition, physical inactivity, tobacco consumption and harmful use of alcohol.

Two out of every five women with diabetes are of reproductive age, accounting for over 60 million women worldwide. Women with diabetes have more difficulty conceiving and may have poor pregnancy outcomes. Without pre-conception planning, type 1 and type 2 diabetes can result in a significantly higher risk of maternal and child mortality and morbidity.

Approximately one in seven births is affected by gestational diabetes (GDM), a severe and neglected threat to maternal and child health. Many women with GDM experience pregnancy related complications including high blood pressure, large birth weight babies and obstructed labour. A significant number of women with GDM also go on to develop type 2 diabetes resulting in further healthcare complications and costs.

Stigmatisation and discrimination faced by people with diabetes are particularly pronounced for girls and women, who carry a double burden of discrimination because of their health status and the inequalities perpetrated in male dominated societies. These inequalities can discourage girls and women from seeking diagnosis and treatment, preventing them from achieving positive health outcomes.


Meet Toby Smithson, RDN, LDN, CDE

Toby Smithson is a Registered Dietitian, a Certified Diabetes Educator, a national spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association, and holds a certification in adult weight management. Toby was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes in October, 1968, and has managed diabetes personally every single day since with no hint of complications. Toby founded DiabetesEveryDay to share her insights into successful diabetes self-management.



DiabetesEveryDay.com members enjoy 24/7 access to weekly menu selections, recipes (developed by dietitians for heart health and carbohydrate management), grocery lists and a unique library of video clips featuring Toby Smithson. New content is added weekly, Toby draws upon her own extraordinary diabetes management success to make this overwhelming responsibility for self-care both understandable and practical. She explores not only the nuts and bolts….medical issues, food and physical activity….but also everyday lifestyle, emotional challenges, stress, and life changing motivation; the real keys to success. To learn more, visit DiabetesEveryDay.com

Blue Circle Dance

About 500 employees, families and friends of Novo Nordisk from all around the world filmed themselves while dancing to 'Move your feet' by Junior Senior. The idea is to generate awareness for diabetes on World Diabetes Day 14 November.






Nutrition.gov News

Dietitian Blog List