Monday, July 31, 2017

August Food, Nutrition, and Health Events


Current News, Resources and Events in Nutrition, Food, Health, Environment, Safety and Disability Rights. Encourages awareness and inspires ideas for Journalists, Educators, Consumers and Health Professionals. Wellness News is up-dated daily and includes weekly and daily events. To view the entire Newsletter online click here



August
Events, Celebrations and Resources


Food Events

Kids Eat Right Month



National Water Quality Month





National Goat Cheese Month


1-7 World Breastfeeding Week
 


National Farmer's Market Week
 



Exercise with Your Child Week



Wellness News employs young adults with "Special Needs" (Cerebral Palsy, Autism, Down Syndrome, Muscular Dystrophy). Please visit our Gallery to purchase photographs of our Food Art with the proceeds going to special need young adults. Contact Dr. Sandra Frank for additional information (recipenews@gmail.com).

Prepared by
Dietitians-Online
Weighing-Success
Wellness News

Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RD, LDN
Jake Frank
Michelle Canazaro
John Gargiullo


August is Kids Eat Right Month - Share the Message

Kids Eat Right is a joint initiative from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (Academy) and Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Foundation. Kids Eat Right supports the efforts of the White House to end the childhood obesity epidemic within a generation. The goal of Kids Eat Right is to educate families, communities, and policy makers about the importance of good nutrition.
August is Kids Eat Right Month, a new nutrition education, information sharing and action campaign created by Kids Eat Right, an initiative of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and its Foundation.

Kids Eat Right Month spotlights healthy nutrition and active lifestyles for children and families, offering simple steps to help families cook healthy, eat right and shop smart.





The Kids Eat Right website centers around the theme "Shop-Cook-Eat." The goal is to bring families together each day for nutritious meals by providing simple and easily to follow tasks.


 
Kids Eat Right

How to shop for healthy foods for your family.

How to cook foods to get the most nutrient value, including tips and recipes.

The benefits of eating together as well as tips to eat when away from home.
 Share the Monday Message Campaign involves Academy member volunteers who distribute weekly advice through social media channels (such as Facebook, Twitter, blogs, etc.). The Kids Eat Right campaign provides resources to help Academy members become recognized leaders in childhood obesity prevention. Volunteers then educate the community on shopping ideas, cooking tips, eating right and recipes.

The following slides are examples of Monday Messages. Links to the articles are provided below. I encourage you to visit the Kids Eat Right website where you can view all the available messages. 


Kids Eat Right - Monday Messages













Consumers, Caregivers, Educators, Journalists, Policy Makers 
To learn more about Kids Eat Right, visit Kids Eat Right

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
To become a volunteer, visit About Kids Eat Right 


   


National Avocado Day - Celebrate Avocados

Avocados offer nearly 20 vitamins and minerals in every serving, including potassium (which helps control blood pressure), lutein (which is good for your eyes), and folate (which is crucial for cell repair and during pregnancy).

Avocados are a good source of B vitamins, which help you fight off disease and infection. They also give you vitamins C and E, plus natural plant chemicals that may help prevent cancer.



Avocados are low in sugar. And they contain fiber, which helps you feel full longer. In one study, people who added a fresh avocado half to their lunch were less interested in eating during the next three hours.

Fat and Calories

Avocados are high in fat. But it's monounsaturated fat, which is a "good" fat that helps lower bad cholesterol, as long as you eat them in moderation. 

Avocados have a lot of calories. The recommended serving size is smaller than you’d expect: 1/5 of a medium avocado (or 1 ounce) is 50 calories.

Recipe: California Avocado Super Summer Wrap Recipe,
Fruits & Veggies— More Matters  
How to Prepare Avocados

Store avocados at room temperature, keeping in mind that they can take 4 to 5 days to ripen. To speed up the ripening process, put them in a paper bag along with an apple or banana. When the outside skins are black or dark purple and yield to gentle pressure, they’re ready to eat or refrigerate.

Wash them before cutting so dirt and bacteria aren’t transferred from the knife onto the pulp.

While guacamole is arguably the most popular way to eat avocado, you can also puree and toss with pasta, substitute for butter or oil in your favorite baked good recipes, or spread or slice onto sandwiches. Try adding avocado to salad, pizza, soup, salsa, eggs and sandwiches.
When ordering at a restaurant, remember that not all avocado dishes are created equal. Some items -- like avocado fries and avocado egg rolls -- are coated in batter and fried, making them much higher in both calories and fat.

Allergic to Latex?
If you have a latex allergy, talk to your doctor before adding avocado to your diet. People with a serious allergy to latex may also experience symptoms after eating avocado.

Resources
Top 10 Ways To Enjoy Avocados, Fruits and Veggies More Matters






Sunday, July 30, 2017

Celebrating Blueberries



On May 8, 1999 Dan Glickman, Secretary of Agriculture of the United States of America proclaimed the month of July as "National Blueberry Month".

Spotlight on Blueberries

Blueberry Facts.
Blueberries are a native North American fruit produced in 35 States.

Fresh blueberries are available for about eight months of the year from producers across the United States and Canada. North America is the world's leading blueberry producer. The North American harvest runs from mid-April through early October, with peak harvest in mid-May through August.

Blueberries can be found in the market all year round, along with frozen, canned and dried blueberries.

Blueberries are low in calories and sodium and are a good source of fiber.

Blueberries rank high in antioxidants that help protect against cancer, heart disease and other age-related diseases.

Researchers have found compounds in blueberries that may help prevent urinary tract infection.

How To Select and Store Blueberries

Purchasing Blueberries
When purchasing fresh blueberries, look for firm, plump, dry berries with smooth skins and a silvery sheen. Check the color - reddish berries aren’t ripe, but can be used in cooking. Avoid soft or shriveled fruit, or any signs of mold. Containers with juice stains indicate that the fruit may be bruised.

Storing Blueberries
Refrigerate fresh blueberries as soon as you get them home, in their original plastic pack or in a covered bowl or storage container. Wash berries just before use. Use within 10 days of purchase.

Freezing Blueberries
Freeze unwashed and completely dry. Discard berries that are bruised or shriveled. Blueberries can be frozen in their original plastic pack or in a resealable plastic or frozen bag or transfered to freezer containerRemember to rinse them before using.

Serving Suggestions
*Add blueberries to your favorite muffin or pancake recipe.
*Combine blueberries with yogurt and granola cereal.

*Sprinkle blueberries over mixed greens.
*Serve blueberries with sour cream, yogurt or cottage cheese.

Celebrating Blueberries
During the month of July, we enjoyed the sweet flavor of blueberries in various recipes. Below are some of the photographs taken to capture their versatility and beauty.




Recipe. Frozen Blueberry Yogurt (low fat) with Fresh Blueberries 

Recipe. Blueberry Ices with Kiwi and Blueberries 

Recipe. Orange Sections and Fresh Blueberries 

Recipe. Blueberries with Vanilla Ice Cream (light),
Blueberry Ices and Frozen Blueberry Yogurt (low fat)

Recipe. Blueberry Crumb Ice Cream
with Fresh Blueberries
 

Recipe. Fruit Garden with Blueberries, Watermelon,
Pineapples, Grapes, and Kiwi

Resources
North American Blueberry Council. NABC, The North American Blueberry Council
U.S. Highbush Blueberry Council


National Horseradish Month - All About Horseradish

Horseradish is a perennial plant which also includes mustard, wasabi, broccoli, and cabbage. It grows up to 4.9 feet (1.5 meters) tall, and is cultivated primarily for its large, white, tapered root.


The intact horseradish root has hardly any scent. When cut or grated, enzymes break down sinigrin (a glucosinolate) to produce allyl isothiocyanate (mustard oil), which irritates the mucous membranes of the sinuses and eyes. Grated horseradish should be used immediately or preserved in vinegar for best flavor. Once exposed to air or heat it will begin to lose its pungency, darken in color, and become unpleasantly bitter tasting.

Growing Horseradish


Nutrition: The fresh plant contains an average 79 mg of vitamin C per 100 g of raw horseradish.

Culinary Use
Cooks use the terms "horseradish" or "prepared horseradish" to refer to the grated root of the horseradish plant mixed with vinegar. Prepared horseradish is white to creamy-beige in color. It will keep for months refrigerated but eventually will darken, indicating it is losing flavor and should be replaced. The leaves of the plant, while edible, are not commonly eaten, and are referred to as "horseradish greens", which have a flavor of root.

Horseradish sauce made from grated horseradish root and vinegar is a popular condiment; used with roast beef and other dishes, including sandwiches or salads. In the USA, the term "horseradish sauce" refers to grated horseradish combined with mayonnaise or salad dressing. Prepared horseradish is a common ingredient in Bloody Mary cocktails and in cocktail sauce, and is used as a sauce or sandwich spread.


Recipes
Baked Salmon with Horseradish Sauce

Number of Servings: 2

Ingredients:
2, 5 oz Salmon filets
2 Tbs. Lemon Juice
1 Tbs. Worchester Sauce
1 Tbs. Mayonnaise, light
1 Tsp. Horseradish
Paprika

Directions:
Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. 
Rinse filets and pat dry. In baking dish combine lemon juice and Worchestersauce. Add salmon and coat both sides with mixture. Combine mayonnaise and horseradish, mix well and spread over top of salmon filets. Sprinkle paprika over filets. Cover dish with foil. Bake in 400 degree F oven for eight minutes. Uncover and continue baking for 3 more minutes.

Nutrition Analysis


Additional Recipes
1. About.com, Home Cooking, Horseradish Recipes
2. Horseradish Information Council, Recipes 
3. Huffpost Taste, Horseradish Recipes  


Medical
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of horseradish for the following medical uses: Urinary tract problems, Fluid retention (edema), Cough, Bronchitis, Achy joints and muscles, Gout, Gallbladder disorders,  Sciatic nerve pain, Colic, and Intestinal worms in children.

Side Effects, Precautions and Warnings
Mustard oil is extremely irritating to the lining of the mouth, throat, nose, digestive system, and urinary tract. Horseradish can cause side effects including stomach upset, bloody vomiting, and diarrhea. It may also slow down the activity of the thyroid gland.

When used on the skin, horseradish is possibly safe, but in large quantities may cause skin irritation and allergic reactions.

Horseradish is unsafe in children less than 4 years old. In young children it may cause digestive tract problems.

Horseradish in large amounts is unsafe when pregnant and breast-feeding. The mustard oil in Horseradish can be toxic and irritating. Horseradish tincture should not be used regularly or in large amounts because it might cause a miscarriage.

Horseradish is not recommended with any of the following conditions: stomach or intestinal ulcers, inflammatory bowel disease, infections or other digestive tract conditions.

Horseradish may worsen hypothyroidism. 

There is concern horseradish might increase urine flow. This could be a problem for people with kidney disorders. 

References and Resources
1. WebMD, Horseradish 
2. Wikipedia, Horseradish 






Saturday, July 29, 2017

July 29, National Lasagna Day
Featuring Spinach Tofu Lasagna



Spinach Tofu Lasagna
Makes six to eight servings. 
Adapted from Animals Deserve Absolute Protection Today and Tomorrow (ADAPTT.)  ADAPTT believes all animals have an inherent right to be free and live completely unfettered by human dominance. 




Ingredients
1/2 lb. lasagna noodles
2 10-oz. packages frozen chopped spinach, thawed, drained
1 lb. soft tofu
1 lb. firm tofu
1/4 cup soy milk
1/2 tsp. garlic powder
2 tbsp. lemon juice
3 tsp. minced basil
4 cups vegan tomato sauce

Directions 
Cook the lasagna noodles according to the package directions. Drain and set aside on a towel. Do not let them stick together. If this happens, run warm water over them to separate.

Preheat oven to 350ᵒ degrees F.

Squeeze the spinach as dry as possible and set aside. Place the tofu, soy milk, garlic powder, lemon juice, and basil in a food processor or blender and blend until smooth.

Cover the bottom of a 9 x 13 baking dish with a thin layer of tomato sauce, then a layer of noodles (use about one-third). Follow with a layer of half of the tofu filling and half of the spinach. Continue in the same order using half of the remaining tomato sauce and noodles and all of the remaining tofu filling and spinach. End with the remaining noodles, covered by the remaining tomato sauce.

Bake for 25 to 30 minutes.






To encourage healthy eating, prepare and present the foods with the
same attention to details, as if you were a pastry chef.
- Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RD, LDN



Friday, July 28, 2017

Good-bye Food Pyramid, Hello Food Plate

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is retiring the Food Pyramid and replacing it with a plate icon. The new image is expected to be revealed on Thursday, June 2, 2011.

I'm not sorry to see the food pyramid being replaced. The design presented challenges in counseling and education.

The USDA said in a statement this week that the new food icon would be "part of a comprehensive nutrition education initiative providing consumers with easy-to-understand recommendations, a new website with additional information, and other tools and resources."


The plate design will be a welcomed change. One of the advantages in using a food plate is the ability to visually demonstrate portion sizes.

 The History of Plate Sizes

Fast foods do not have a monopoly on super size. The plate industry has had its own growth spurt during the past 50 years. In the 1960's dinner plates were about 8.5 to 9-inches in diameter and held about 800 calories; by 2009 plate size had grown to 12-inches with the capacity to hold about 1900 calories. The calorie differences are illustrated in the graphic below. (Calorie amounts will vary depending on the foods you choose.)

Graphic 1


Our Eyes Can Deceive Us

Last night, I tried an experiment with my family. First each person was presented with dinner on an 8.5 inch plate. Then I removed the plates and set out the 12-inch plates. When asked which plate had more food, five out of six said the 8.5 inch plate.

The amount of food was identical, but when comparing the two sizes the participants looked to see how much food filled their plate.

                                                                   Graphic 2

This is a further illustration of the same amount of food on different plate sizes. The larger the plate, the smaller the food appeared.


Next, I wanted to see how much food the different size plates could hold.  The calorie amounts differ from graphic 1 due to the foods I used, but there was a significant increase in calories as the size of the plate grew.



July 28, National Milk Chocolate Day


Resources

1. Drinking Chocolate Milk May Help Your Workout - WebMD

2. Health by Chocolate - WebMD
3. Your Grade Schooler Won't Drink Milk — Now What?  #EatRight





Wednesday, July 26, 2017

July 26, Americans with Disabilities Act Signed




President George Bush signs the Americans with Disabilities Act during a ceremony on the South Lawn of the White House July 26, 1990.



President Donald J. Trump Proclaims July 26, 2017, as a Day in Celebration of the 27th Anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act.


For Americans with disabilities,
Trump’s policies are  
dangerous.


Across the country, people with disabilities are continuing to lead the fight for inclusivity and recognition, with the support of their families, advocates, and human services professionals. What will happen under a Trump administration. The fight is going to get a lot harder.

Trump’s mocking of disabled New York Times reporter Serge Kovaleski in 2016 has been widely recognized, but his actual policies for people with disabilities are just terrible. His plan to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA), even without a replacement, is dangerous for the many people with disabilities who now worry about losing their health insurance. His promise to cut Medicaid is also disastrous for the more than 10 million people with disabilities who rely on it in order to to receive services, like community-based care which promotes independent living opportunities and integrated work and community environments. And his record of haphazardly enforcing the Americans with Disabilities Act, as well as the removal of the White House website’s pages on access and inclusion shortly after he came to office, indicate very clearly that people with disabilities are simply not a priority for a Trump administration.


Donald Trump Accused of Mocking Reporter with Disability




I don't understand how our President can make fun of a disabled person and numerous ethnic groups. 

Health Care

As our country decides on a new health care program, those of us with disabled and elderly family members - wait in fear. Though Trump promised he would not touch Medicare, Medicaid, and Social Security,



Resources
United States Department of Labor, Americans with Disabilities Act
ADA.gov, Home Page
Wikipedia, Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990
Huffpost, 3 Trump Properties Hit With New Disabilities Violations Complaints
Including his brand-new, “very special” hotel in Washington, D.C.
Daily Beast, 
Donald Trump’s War on People With Disabilities





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